Let's Help Each Other

Physical therapy is changing rapidly. As a PT with more than thirty years of experience, the changes observed in the last ten years triple those of the first twenty years. The pace of change is not slowing down. The Medigraph Blog will serve as a forum that will enable us to exchange ideas and assist each other. This blog will be used to share billing, documentation, and any other ideas to improve any aspects of our profession. If we share what we have learned, we can develop a resource that enables our collective understanding to advance our careers.

As profit margins grow smaller and expenses grow larger, we need to assist each other to survive and prosper. If we share our experiences we can help each other to grow professionally, administratively, and financially. Our professional lives, our livelihood, and our personal lives are intertwined. Our resources individually are limited. Together we can accomplish more than we can individually. Let's help each other

Regards,

Tom Kane, PT
MediGraph Software

Cold Laser Therapy
7/26/2010 3:19:00 PM

I have had DJD of the left humeral head for years. Weight lifting, 30 years of martial arts training, and multiple impacts have taken their toll on the shoulder. Making matters worse I continue to participate in these activities. Seeking relief I attempted CLT (cold laser therapy). It worked. Chronic pain levels have been reduced by at least 65-75% with a similar increase in function. I have also experienced exceptional results treating patients with CLT. The conditions that have responded to CLT include everything from root canals to hemorrhoids (literally). The results have been impressive. There is only one problem. Insurance providers do not like to pay for this intervention (I have yet to find a treatment they do like paying for). Wanting to continue to provide this effective modality I was forced to reconsider the manner in which this intervention was offered.

The sad truth is that narrow profit margins make it difficult for we PTs to render treatment without a fee for service. Though many of us often provide professional courtesy to those in need, it is difficult to invest a few thousand dollars in equipment that does not generate revenue. We want to help our patients but if we cannot pay the rent, electricity, and the staff, we will not be treating anyone. I discovered a method of delivering CLT that has increased cash flow and referrals. I began to offer CLT on a cash basis only, promoting the benefits to athletes and musicians. Good things happened.

Athletes and musicians are receptive to CLT and they respond very well to treatment. With musicians, the upper extremity pathology (especially carpel tunnel syndrome) response to CLT is fast and these immediate effects are received enthusiastically by this demographic. Word spread quickly among musicians and over time this patient demographic became a referral source that eventually became a cash flow generator. As you would suspect, musicians know dancers, and dancers suffer from acute and chronic injuries to the lower extremities. Once again, treating this patient population has led to increased dancer referrals as well. Recreational athletes, especially golfers and tennis players behave in a similar manner to musicians. The effectiveness of CLT can spread quickly at the club house and tennis clubs. Perhaps you should consider adding this modality to your facility.

Regards,

Tom Kane, PT